Comfort of Little Places

“I am interested in creating an environment which at first glance appears safe and yet is a distortion of that which is intimate and secure, an illusion of security.”


Comfort of Little Places

With dangerously high beds and miniscule doll-like figures, Fabrica’s 1998 exhibition Comfort of Little Places looked like a strange scene from a fairytale – or a disturbing dream.

Artist Permindar Kaur recreated her critically acclaimed installation Comfort of Little Places at Fabrica. Tall, stark beds were constructed to stand far above visitors heads, with steel legs 3 metres high. Toy-like cloth figures, clothed in armour, were fixed to walls like trophies or placed in intimate corners of the gallery where they had to searched out. Kaur makes objects that have their sources in domestic settings or childhood – beds, cots, dolls and dolls clothing – yet there is something in their scale or construction which is haunting.

A British artist of Sikh origin, Kaur explores ideas relating to childhood, innocence and vulnerability, with some references to different religious or historical backgrounds. Kaur’s work addresses notions of sanctuary, safety and comfort yet avoids sentimentality to the point of being unsettling.

Visitor Numbers: 4,282


Exhibition Visitor Comments

I want to climb on one of those beds, to escape up into in times of stress, and take the ladder up with me

Artist bio, useful information and links

Artist bio, useful information and links